Japan

Explanation of symbols

Essential

Clinic

Vaccination

All travellers

When to get vaccinated

Combined Diptheria, Tetanus & Polio Vaccination

2 weeks before travel

Hepatitis B Vaccination

2 months before travel

Japanese Encephalitis Vaccination

6 weeks before travel

  • Please note the above is a guide only. Every journey is unique and should be fully checked with our qualified pharmacists, or healthcare team, before you travel overseas. Disease can vary across a single country and vaccination requirements may differ by local area. Book a consultation with us now to establish the recommended vaccinations and medication for your chosen destination(s)
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Combined Diptheria, Tetanus & Polio Vaccinationclose

Diphtheria is uasually spread by close contact with infected persons. In the UK, the combined Diptheria/Tetanus/Polio vaccine is recommended when diphtheria boosters are indicated for adults. A diphtheria booster lasts 10 years. Tetanus is a serious infection, usually contracted following contamination of wounds. In the UK, after 5 doses of vaccine, tetanus boosters are not routinely required unless travelling to areas with limited medical care. In the UK, the combined Diptheria/Tetanus/Polio vaccine is recommended when tetanus boosters are indicated. A tetanus booster lasts 10 years.

Given as a combined vaccine with polio, tetanus and diphtheria.

Those travelling to an area with poor access to medical attention who have not had a booster in the last 10 years. Additional vaccine information: If your childhood schedule was incomplete, seek guidance about additional doses. In the UK, tetanus vaccine is combined with polio and diphtheria.

A single injection.

2 weeks before travel

General issues: Patients who have had a serious reaction (”anaphylaxis”) to a previous dose of this vaccine or its constituents. Specific issues: Unstable epilepsy.

There is no evidence of risk.

Very few. Temporary tenderness at the site of the injection

£50 per dose

Hepatitis B Vaccinationclose

Hepatitis B is a viral infection which can cause serious liver disease. It is usually spread sexually and by contact with infected blood or body fluids (e.g. puncture of the skin with contaminated needles). Vaccination is recommended for long-stay travellers, and those at risk due to their medical history, activities or work.

Travellers to areas of high or intermediate prevalence who place themselves at risk when abroad should be offered immunisation. The behaviours that place them at risk will include sexual activity, injecting drug use, undertaking relief aid work and/or participating in contact sports. Travellers are also at risk of acquiring infection as a result of medical or dental procedures carried out in countries where unsafe therapeutic injections are a possibility.

Additional vaccine information: The vaccine is available combined with hepatitis A vaccine.

Those travelling to an area with poor access to medical attention who have not had a booster in the last 10 years. Additional vaccine information: If your childhood schedule was incomplete, seek guidance about additional doses. In the UK, tetanus vaccine is combined with polio and diphtheria.

There are several different schedules of vaccination. Usually we advise three doses at 0, 1 and 6 months.

2 months before travel

General issues: Patients who have had a serious reaction (”anaphylaxis”) to a previous dose of this vaccine or its constituents. Specific issues: Vaccination should not replace other protective measures against infection, for example the use of condoms.

There is no evidence of risk.

Life cover after a full 3 dose course

Very few. Temporary tenderness at the site of the injection

£62 per dose

Japanese Encephalitis Vaccinationclose

Japanese Encephalitis is a viral infection causing a severe flu like illness. It is spread by mosquitoes that bite between dusk and dawn, and occurs mainly in rice and paddy field areas, often where pig farming takes place. Vaccination is recommended for rural or long-stay travellers in affected areas.

Inactivated strains of Japanese Encephalitis virus.

Those travelling to or residing in areas where the disease is common. The disease is seasonal in some areas, and plans for protection should be considered accordingly. Additional vaccine information: Only IXIARO vaccine is licenced in the UK.

Two doses at 0 and 28 days. Vaccine effective 7 days after 2nd dose.

6 weeks before travel

Patients who have had a serious reaction (”anaphylaxis”) to a previous dose of this vaccine or its constituents.

Subject to medical assessment, vaccine is not recommended for pregnant or breast feeding women.

Very few. Temporary tenderness at the site of the injection.

£105 per dose

Yellow Fever Vaccinationclose

Yellow Fever is spread by mosquitoes and is found in tropical parts of Africa and South America. Some countries require proof of yellow fever vaccination in the form of an International Certificate of Vaccination before they allow a traveller to enter. Failure to provide a valid certificate can lead to a traveller being quarantined, immunised or denied entry.

A LIVE attenuated (weakened) strain of Yellow Fever virus.

Persons aged nine months or older who are travelling to countries that require an International Certificate of Vaccination for entry, or who are travelling to or living in infected areas or countries in the yellow fever endemic zone even if these countries do not require evidence of immunisation on entry. Additional vaccine information: Only a licenced Yellow Fever Centre can provide vaccination. Travellers will require an Internarional Certificate of Vaccination prior to travel to countries where the disease is found. The certificate only becomes valid 10 days after injection. Travellers should factor this in to their plans.

A single injection.

2 weeks before travel

General issues: There is a risk of a rare but serious adverse event, whcih particularly affects infants and older patients. Vaccination should only be provided after a careful assessment of health and travel plans by the clinic. Specific issues: HIV infected patients should not be vaccinated. Patients with thymus disease should not be vaccinated. Those who have received a live vaccination within the last 4 weeks eg MMR or BCG should delay Yellow Fever vaccination by one month. However live vaccines can be given together on the same day.

The vaccine may not be given to pregnant women. In breast feeding, there is no evidence of harm to the baby, but the need for vaccination requires careful assessment.

Adverse reactions following yellow fever vaccine are typically mild and consist of headache, muscle pain, low grade fever and/or soreness at the injection site. This occurs in about 10 to 30% of recipients.

£85 per dose

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