Sudan

Explanation of symbols

Essential

Clinic

Vaccination

All travellers

When to get vaccinated

Hepatitis A Vaccination

2 weeks before travel

Malaria Tablets

Yellow Fever Vaccination

2 weeks before travel

Combined Diptheria, Tetanus & Polio Vaccination

2 weeks before travel

Hepatitis B Vaccination

2 months before travel

Rabies Vaccination

1 month before travel

Meningitis ACWY Vaccination

2-3 weeks before travel

Tuberculosis (BCG) national shortage! Phone us to go on waiting list

3 months before travel

Typhoid Vaccination

2 weeks before travel

  • Please note the above is a guide only. Every journey is unique and should be fully checked with our qualified pharmacists, or healthcare team, before you travel overseas. Disease can vary across a single country and vaccination requirements may differ by local area. Book a consultation with us now to establish the recommended vaccinations and medication for your chosen destination(s)
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Hepatitis A Vaccinationclose

Hepatitis A is a viral infection which can cause severe liver disease. The viral infection is usually spread by contaminated food and water.

Travellers will receive an active vaccine. This is a purified, inactivated preparation of hepatitis A virus.

Those travelling to or who will be residing in areas where the disease is common, particularly if sanitation and food hygiene is likely to be poor. Additional vaccine information: The vaccine is also available combined with hepatitis B or typhoid.

A single injection 2 weeks prior to travel. Then a reinforcing dose 6-12 months later.

2 weeks before travel

General issues: Patients who have had a serious reaction (”anaphylaxis”) to a previous dose of this vaccine or its constituents. Specific issues: One brand of vaccine ”Epaxal” should not be given to those who have had anaphylaxis to hens’ eggs.

There is no evidence of risk.

Very few. Temporary tenderness at the site of the injection.

£82 per dose

Combined Diptheria, Tetanus & Polio Vaccinationclose

Diphtheria is uasually spread by close contact with infected persons. In the UK, the combined Diptheria/Tetanus/Polio vaccine is recommended when diphtheria boosters are indicated for adults. A diphtheria booster lasts 10 years. Tetanus is a serious infection, usually contracted following contamination of wounds. In the UK, after 5 doses of vaccine, tetanus boosters are not routinely required unless travelling to areas with limited medical care. In the UK, the combined Diptheria/Tetanus/Polio vaccine is recommended when tetanus boosters are indicated. A tetanus booster lasts 10 years.

Given as a combined vaccine with polio, tetanus and diphtheria.

Those travelling to an area with poor access to medical attention who have not had a booster in the last 10 years. Additional vaccine information: If your childhood schedule was incomplete, seek guidance about additional doses. In the UK, tetanus vaccine is combined with polio and diphtheria.

A single injection.

2 weeks before travel

General issues: Patients who have had a serious reaction (”anaphylaxis”) to a previous dose of this vaccine or its constituents. Specific issues: Unstable epilepsy.

There is no evidence of risk.

Very few. Temporary tenderness at the site of the injection

£50 per dose

Hepatitis B Vaccinationclose

Hepatitis B is a viral infection which can cause serious liver disease. It is usually spread sexually and by contact with infected blood or body fluids (e.g. puncture of the skin with contaminated needles). Vaccination is recommended for long-stay travellers, and those at risk due to their medical history, activities or work.

Travellers to areas of high or intermediate prevalence who place themselves at risk when abroad should be offered immunisation. The behaviours that place them at risk will include sexual activity, injecting drug use, undertaking relief aid work and/or participating in contact sports. Travellers are also at risk of acquiring infection as a result of medical or dental procedures carried out in countries where unsafe therapeutic injections are a possibility.

Additional vaccine information: The vaccine is available combined with hepatitis A vaccine.

Those travelling to an area with poor access to medical attention who have not had a booster in the last 10 years. Additional vaccine information: If your childhood schedule was incomplete, seek guidance about additional doses. In the UK, tetanus vaccine is combined with polio and diphtheria.

There are several different schedules of vaccination. Usually we advise three doses at 0, 1 and 6 months.

2 months before travel

General issues: Patients who have had a serious reaction (”anaphylaxis”) to a previous dose of this vaccine or its constituents. Specific issues: Vaccination should not replace other protective measures against infection, for example the use of condoms.

There is no evidence of risk.

Life cover after a full 3 dose course

Very few. Temporary tenderness at the site of the injection

£62 per dose

Tuberculosis (BCG) national shortage! Phone us to go on waiting listclose

BCG is a Live safe attenuated (weakened form) of Tuberculosis (TB)

BCG vaccination can be given safely to any person of any age, from new born through to old age. This is a once only vaccination in the UK and is highly recommended by the DH to specific groups at higher risk of exposure to TB.

BCG is a single once only injection given by specially trained nurses where there is evidence of a negative tuberculin skin test (mantoux)

3 months before travel

People who have had TB in the past and those with a positive mantoux skin test. This is a live vaccine therefore conditions such as HIV or cancer is contra-indicated. Many people with conditions however can successfully receive BCG with specific nurse management. Those who have received a live vaccination within the last 4 weeks eg MMR or Yellow Fever should delay BCG vaccination by one month. However live vaccines can be given together on the same day.

Although no adverse reports, it is best to avoid BCG in pregnancy. BCG is not contra-indicated in breast feeding therefore can be given after delivery.

25 years – life

A mild local reaction at the BCG injection site is typical. A small blister like response and local reaction is to be expected and this is evidence that the vaccination has been successful, leaving a characteristic small scar.

£70 per dose

Typhoid Vaccinationclose

Typhoid fever is a bacterial infection usually spread by contaminated food and water. It can cause a serious illness, but vaccines offer up to 80 % protection.

There are two types of vaccine available: an injectable and an oral variety. We recommend the use of the injectable variety.

Travellers to countries where typhoid is common, especially if staying with or visiting the local population, orwith frequent and/or prolonged exposure to conditions where sanitation and food hygiene are likely to be poor. Additional vaccine information: The vaccine is available in a combined preparation with Hepatitis A.

A single dose by injection.

2 weeks before travel

General issues: Patients who have had a serious reaction (”anaphylaxis”) to a previous dose of this vaccine or its constituents. Specific issues: If you decide to have the oral preparation, you should discuss malaria treatment with the clinician

There is no data available about safety in prgnancy and breast feeding. So, subject to medical assessment, vaccine is not recommended for pregnant or breast feeding women.

Very few. Temporary tenderness at the site of the injection. Some patients describe temporary headache and nausea.

£56 per dose

Malaria Tabletsclose

Book a consultation to discuss your malaria requirements with one of our travel nurses. Which malaria medicine is required depends on your risk assessment.

Malarone – £3.50 per tablet, Larium – £3.80 per tablet & Doxycycline – 50p per tablet.
Recommendations for Malaria tablets to prevent malaria differ by country of travel. No antimalarial drug is 100% protective and must be combined with the use of personal protective measures, (i.e., insect repellent, long sleeves, long pants, sleeping in a mosquito-free setting or using an insecticide-treated bednet).

There are two types of vaccine available: an injectable and an oral variety. We recommend the use of the injectable variety.

Travellers to countries where typhoid is common, especially if staying with or visiting the local population, orwith frequent and/or prolonged exposure to conditions where sanitation and food hygiene are likely to be poor. Additional vaccine information: The vaccine is available in a combined preparation with Hepatitis A.

A single dose by injection.

2 weeks before travel

General issues: Patients who have had a serious reaction (”anaphylaxis”) to a previous dose of this vaccine or its constituents. Specific issues: If you decide to have the oral preparation, you should discuss malaria treatment with the clinician

There is no data available about safety in prgnancy and breast feeding. So, subject to medical assessment, vaccine is not recommended for pregnant or breast feeding women.

Very few. Temporary tenderness at the site of the injection. Some patients describe temporary headache and nausea.

£56 per dose

Rabies Vaccinationclose

Rabies is a viral infection usually spread by the saliva of infected animals. Human cases are usually due to dog bites but many animals can be infected, and a scratch or lick may be sufficient to transmite the disease. Rabies is fatal once symptoms begin.

Inactivated rabies virus particles

Travellers for more than one month to areas with rabies, unless there is reliable access to prompt, safe medical care, or who may be exposed to rabies because of their travel activities, or those who would have limited access to post-exposure medical care. Additional vaccine information: Even if vaccinated, travellers who have sustained an animal bite must obtain urgent medical advice.

Three doses at 0, 7 and 28 days.

1 month before travel

General issues: The single site, intradermal 0.1ml pre-exposure vaccine regimen should not be used in those taking chloroquine for malaria prophylaxis, as this suppresses the response. Specific issues: A confirmed anaphylactic reaction to a previous dose of rabies vaccine, or a confirmed anaphylactic reaction to any component of the vaccine.

Pregnant women and breast-feeding mothers should only be given pre-exposure vaccination if the risk of exposure to rabies is high and rapid access to treatment would be limited.

Rabies vaccine may cause local reactions such as redness, swelling or pain at the site of injection within 24 to 48 hours of administration. Reactions such as headache, fever, muscle aches, vomiting and nettlerash are rare.

£87 per dose

Meningitis ACWY Vaccinationclose

For travellers, there are available two quadrivalent vaccines – (protecting aginst four strains, A, C, W and Y): “polysaccharide” and “conjugate”. UK authorities recommend the use of the conjugate vaccine, and we can advise you about the choice.

In some areas of the world, the risk of acquiring meningococcal infection particularly of developing serogroup A disease is much higher than in the UK. Individuals who are particularly at risk are visitors who live or travel ‘rough’, such as backpackers, and those living or working with local people.

Additional vaccine information: 1. Many UK travellers will have received meningitis C vaccination in childhood. Meningitis travel vaccine is required in addition to this protection. 2. Large epidemics of both serogroup A and W135 meningococcal infection have occurred in association with Hajj pilgrimages, and proof of vaccination against A, C, W135 and Y serogroups is now a visa entry requirement for pilgrims and seasonal workers travelling to Saudi Arabia.

A single dose.

2-3 weeks before travel

General issues: A confirmed anaphylactic reaction to a previous dose of the vaccine, or to any constituent of the vaccine, including meningococcal polysaccharide. Specific issues: A confirmed anaphylactic reaction to diphtheria toxoid or the CRM197 carrier protein or tetanus toxoid.

There is no evidence of risk.

For conjugate vaccine, reported reactions included injection site reactions including pain, and redness, headache, nausea, rash and malaise. For polysaccharide vaccine, generalised reactions are rare although pyrexia occurs more frequently in young children than in adults. Injection site reactions occur in approximately 10% of recipients and last for approximately 24 to 48 hours.

£90 per dose

Yellow Fever Vaccinationclose

Yellow Fever is spread by mosquitoes and is found in tropical parts of Africa and South America. Some countries require proof of yellow fever vaccination in the form of an International Certificate of Vaccination before they allow a traveller to enter. Failure to provide a valid certificate can lead to a traveller being quarantined, immunised or denied entry.

A LIVE attenuated (weakened) strain of Yellow Fever virus.

Persons aged nine months or older who are travelling to countries that require an International Certificate of Vaccination for entry, or who are travelling to or living in infected areas or countries in the yellow fever endemic zone even if these countries do not require evidence of immunisation on entry. Additional vaccine information: Only a licenced Yellow Fever Centre can provide vaccination. Travellers will require an Internarional Certificate of Vaccination prior to travel to countries where the disease is found. The certificate only becomes valid 10 days after injection. Travellers should factor this in to their plans.

A single injection.

2 weeks before travel

General issues: There is a risk of a rare but serious adverse event, whcih particularly affects infants and older patients. Vaccination should only be provided after a careful assessment of health and travel plans by the clinic. Specific issues: HIV infected patients should not be vaccinated. Patients with thymus disease should not be vaccinated. Those who have received a live vaccination within the last 4 weeks eg MMR or BCG should delay Yellow Fever vaccination by one month. However live vaccines can be given together on the same day.

The vaccine may not be given to pregnant women. In breast feeding, there is no evidence of harm to the baby, but the need for vaccination requires careful assessment.

Adverse reactions following yellow fever vaccine are typically mild and consist of headache, muscle pain, low grade fever and/or soreness at the injection site. This occurs in about 10 to 30% of recipients.

£85 per dose

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